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120 years with Einar Willumsen

Beverages through the years

Follow us along the journey of beverages through the decades, as we introduce a selection of trending drinks from the early 1900s through to today.

AdobeStock_114267189_Daquiri

The original daiquiri

Did you know that daiquiris reportedly became popular in the 1940s, because the rationings of World War II made, for example, whisky and vodka difficult to obtain, whereas rum, due to trade agreements with e.g. the Latin American countries, was much easier to get hold of? It is difficult to know for certain the history surrounding the Daiquiri Cocktail. However, many agree on its creator was a man called Jennings Stockton Cox an American mining engineer. His granddaughter tells that this cocktail was invented when Cox received American guests. He had no more gin and did not want to offer a dry rum, so he made a cocktail with ingredients he had. He mixed in each glass some rum, the juice of half a lime, and a teaspoonful of sugar. He then filled the glass with ice and stirred it well. Here is the recipe for the original Daiquiri:

Ingredients:

  • 4 cl Rum
  • 3 cl freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 2 cl syrup (sugar dissolved in water: 1 dl water and 2 dl sugar. Dissolve the sugar under low heat on a stove)

Here’s how to do it:

1. Pour all the ingredients into a shaker filled with ice.
2. Shake it for approx. 15 seconds.
3. Pour the content into a chilled coupe cocktail glass. Enjoy!

Singapore Sling

Did you know where the ‘Singapore Sling’ drink originates from? … Singapore..? The story tells that’ it was the Chinese bartender Ngiam Tong Boon who around 1910 came up with the insane and sophisticated cocktail with no less than eight ingredients. Here’s the story as we know it. Back in early 1900s gender equality still had a long way to go. Even though women were allowed to frequent bars, proper morals and manners meant that it was very frowned upon for ladies to be seen drinking alcohol. While men could freely enjoy all the glasses of whisky and gin they wanted, women had to settle with teas and fruit juices. The bartender Ngiam Tong Boon saw a business opportunity there. With its luxurious decor and lush tropical gardens, the Raffles Hotel Singapore had been the ultimate holiday spot for the rich and famous since opening in 1887, giving affluent travellers a taste of British opulence in exotic South-East Asia (Singapore was a British colony at the time). The hotel’s Bar was also big with wealth. And among this clientele were, quite logically, a great number of women.

To cater to this, Ngiam Tong Boon had the brilliant idea of creating a cocktail that would contain alcohol without anyone suspecting it at first glance: a drink that looked just like a fruit juice. He named this sweet, pink-hued concoction the ”Straits Sling”. It was an instant success. Fruity and sweet like juice, but with the neat edge of gin, the novel drink soon became all the rage among the ladies – and the gentlemen, too. The Straits Sling was renamed Singapore Sling. The Singapore Sling has since become a huge historical asset for the Raffles Hotel and most of the entire world. Singapore Airlines even serves it to all its passengers flying to and from Singapore. Here is the recipe:

  • 30 ml / 1 1⁄2 oz Gin
  • 15 ml / 1⁄2 oz Cherry Brandy
  • 120 ml / 4 oz Pineapple Juice
  • 15 ml / 1/2 oz Lime Juice
  • 7.5 ml / 1/4 oz Cointreau
  • 7.5 ml / 1/4 oz Dom Benedictine
  • 10 ml 1/3 oz Grenadine
  • A Dash of Angostura Bitters
  • Garnish with a slice of Pineapple and Cherry

Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake well and pour in an ice-filled Hurricane or highball glass. Garnish and serve. Enjoy!

Singapore Sl
Singapore Sl

Singapore Sling

Did you know where the ‘Singapore Sling’ drink originates from? … Singapore..? The story tells that’ it was the Chinese bartender Ngiam Tong Boon who around 1910 came up with the insane and sophisticated cocktail with no less than eight ingredients. Here’s the story as we know it. Back in early 1900s gender equality still had a long way to go. Even though women were allowed to frequent bars, proper morals and manners meant that it was very frowned upon for ladies to be seen drinking alcohol. While men could freely enjoy all the glasses of whisky and gin they wanted, women had to settle with teas and fruit juices. The bartender Ngiam Tong Boon saw a business opportunity there. With its luxurious decor and lush tropical gardens, the Raffles Hotel Singapore had been the ultimate holiday spot for the rich and famous since opening in 1887, giving affluent travellers a taste of British opulence in exotic South-East Asia (Singapore was a British colony at the time). The hotel’s Bar was also big with wealth. And among this clientele were, quite logically, a great number of women.

To cater to this, Ngiam Tong Boon had the brilliant idea of creating a cocktail that would contain alcohol without anyone suspecting it at first glance: a drink that looked just like a fruit juice. He named this sweet, pink-hued concoction the ”Straits Sling”. It was an instant success. Fruity and sweet like juice, but with the neat edge of gin, the novel drink soon became all the rage among the ladies – and the gentlemen, too. The Straits Sling was renamed Singapore Sling. The Singapore Sling has since become a huge historical asset for the Raffles Hotel and most of the entire world. Singapore Airlines even serves it to all its passengers flying to and from Singapore. Here is the recipe:

  • 30 ml / 1 1⁄2 oz Gin
  • 15 ml / 1⁄2 oz Cherry Brandy
  • 120 ml / 4 oz Pineapple Juice
  • 15 ml / 1/2 oz Lime Juice
  • 7.5 ml / 1/4 oz Cointreau
  • 7.5 ml / 1/4 oz Dom Benedictine
  • 10 ml 1/3 oz Grenadine
  • A Dash of Angostura Bitters
  • Garnish with a slice of Pineapple and Cherry

Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake well and pour in an ice-filled Hurricane or highball glass. Garnish and serve. Enjoy!

Rum and Cola

In which decade did ‘Rum and Cola’ become popular?

The classic Cuba Libre – also known as Rum & Cola – is a sweet and tasty drink. The drink was created in Cuba around year 1900. Cuba Libre became popular shortly after 1900 when the first Cola began to be imported to Cuba from the United States. The drink originated in Cuba in the early 1900s, but its origin is not certain. Bottled Cola was imported to Cuba in 1898 from the United States. “Cuba libre” (Free Cuba) the drink traditional name, was the slogan of the Cuban Independence Unification. Cuba Libre is sometimes said to have been created during the Spanish-American War. This preceded the first distribution of Cola to Cuba in 1900. Fausto Rodriguez, an advertising administrator at a Rum manufacturer, claimed to have been present, when the drink was first poured. According to Rodriguez this took place in August 1900. One day at a local bar Rodriguez’s employer ordered rum mixed with cola. This fascinated a nearby group of American soldiers, who ordered for themselves and gave the birth to a popular new drink Rum and Cola. We all know Rum & Cola – anyway, here you find the recipe:

  • 5 cl. dark rum
  • 2 cl. lime juice
  • 16 cl. cola
  • 1 slice lime fruit
  • Ice cubes

Fill a tall glass with ice cubes. Put lime juice in the glass. Add dark rum and cola. Garnish the drink with a slice of lime fruit.

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